What is Vitamin E?

Vitamin E is a nutrient found in food and used as a dietary supplement. Vitamin E is the collective name for a group of fat-soluble compounds with distinctive antioxidant activities. Vitamin E was discovered in 1922 by Herbert Evans and Katharine Scott Bishop when they found that it was required to prevent rat sterility (Evans and Bishop, 1922). Vitamin E is found in foods such as vegetable oils, cereals, meat, poultry, eggs, fruits, vegetables, and wheat germ oil. Vitamin E is also available as a dietary supplement.

Vitamin E

What are the benefits of Vitamin E?

Vitamin E is an antioxidant that helps protect cells from damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are molecules that have unpaired electrons. When free radicals interact with other molecules, they can damage those molecules. Vitamin E helps to prevent or repair some of the damage caused by free radicals.

Vitamin E has many potential benefits, including:

-Reducing the risk of heart disease

-Preventing or delaying the onset of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia

-Reducing the risk of cancer

-Treating Vitamin E deficiency

-Lowering the risk of age-related macular degeneration

However, most of these potential benefits are based on observational studies, which means that more research is needed to confirm them. Vitamin E supplements are not likely to help prevent or treat health conditions if you already have enough vitamin E in your diet.

What are the risks of taking Vitamin E?

Vitamin E is generally safe when taken as directed. Vitamin E can cause nausea, diarrhea, headache, and fatigue in some people. Vitamin E can also increase the risk of bleeding and bruising in people with bleeding disorders. Vitamin E may interact with certain medications, so it’s important to speak to your healthcare provider before taking vitamin E supplements.

Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin, which means that it can build up in your body and potentially cause toxicity if you take too much. The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for vitamin E is 15 milligrams (mg) per day for adults and children over the age of 4. The tolerable upper limit (UL) for vitamin E is 1,000 mg per day for adults and children over the age of 14. Vitamin E supplements should not be taken by pregnant or breastfeeding women unless directed by a healthcare provider.

Pharmacokinetics

Vitamin E is absorbed from the intestine and then transported to the liver. Vitamin E is then stored in body fat and other tissues. Vitamin E is excreted in the urine.

Vitamin E supplements are available in many forms, including capsules, tablets, liquids, and topical products. Vitamin E is also found in a variety of foods, such as vegetable oils, nuts, seeds, leafy green vegetables, and fortified cereals.

To get the most benefit from vitamin E, it’s important to consume a variety of foods that contain this nutrient. Vitamin E supplements should only be taken under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

Dosage

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin E is 15 mg per day for adults and children over the age of 4. The tolerable upper limit (UL) for vitamin E is 1,000 mg per day for adults and children over the age of 14. Vitamin E supplements should not be taken by pregnant or breastfeeding women unless directed by a healthcare provider.

If you think you may be deficient in vitamin E, speak to your healthcare provider about whether you need to take a supplement. Vitamin E deficiency is rare, but it can cause problems such as nerve and muscle weakness, vision problems, and anemia. Vitamin E supplements are available in many forms, including capsules, tablets, liquids, and topical products.