Main symptoms of Panic Disorders

Panic disorder is an anxiety disorder that causes repeated and unexpected panic attacks. Panic attacks are sudden periods of intense fear that may include chest pain, heart palpitations, shortness of breath, dizziness, or abdominal distress. During a panic attack, people may feel like they are going to die or lose control of themselves. Panic disorder can cause significant problems in a person’s life, including difficulty with work, school, and personal relationships.

There are several different types of Panic Disorder, each with its own unique set of symptoms. However, the main symptom of all forms of Panic Disorder is the experience of recurrent and unexpected panic attacks. Other common symptoms include:

– Avoidance of situations or places that may trigger a panic attack

– Worrying about having another panic attack

– Change in behavior due to the fear of having a panic attack (e.g., avoiding exercise)

– Difficulty concentrating

– Sleep problems (e.g., difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, nightmares)

– Irritability

– Muscle tension

– sweating

– nausea

– lightheadedness

Treatment

Panic disorder is a treatable condition. A variety of effective treatments are available, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, medication, and self-help techniques. With treatment, most people with Panic Disorder can learn to control their panic attacks and live normal, productive lives. Panic Disorder is a serious condition that should be evaluated and treated by a mental health professional. Panic Disorder is not the same as anxiety, although people with Panic Disorder may experience anxiety symptoms. Panic Disorder is also not the same as a phobia, although people with Panic Disorder may have phobias.

Causation

The cause of Panic Disorder is not fully understood, but it is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Panic Disorder may run in families, but it is also seen in people with no family history of the condition. Panic Disorder is more common in women than men, and it often begins in adolescence or young adulthood. Panic Disorder is not caused by stress, although stress can trigger panic attacks. Panic Disorder is not caused by coffee, tea, chocolate, or other foods or drinks. Panic Disorder is not caused by drugs or alcohol, although drug and alcohol use can trigger panic attacks.

Prevention

Panic Disorder cannot be prevented, but it can be treated. Panic Disorder is a serious condition that should be evaluated and treated by a mental health professional.