What is Nizoral?

Nizoral (ketoconazole) is an antifungal medicine that fights infections caused by fungus.

Nizoral is used to treat skin infections such as athlete’s foot, jock itch, ringworm, and seborrhea (dry, flaking skin).

Nizoral is also used to treat yeast infections of the skin and nails.

Side Effects

More common

Itching

Irritation

Redness

Rash

Stinging

Swelling

Less common or rare

Burning sensation

Discoloration of the skin

Hives

Peeling

Sores

Nizoral is available as a cream, gel, and shampoo. The shampoo is used to treat dandruff.

The cream and gel are used to treat tinea versicolor, a fungal infection that causes a lightening or darkening of the skin.

Mechanism of Action

Nizoral works by inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, a vital component of fungal cell membranes. This leads to the destruction of the fungal cell membrane, and subsequent death of the fungus.

Dosage and Administration

The recommended dosage for Nizoral cream is 2% applied to the affected area(s) of the skin once daily for two weeks. For Nizoral gel, the recommended dose is also 2% applied to the affected area(s) once daily for two weeks. The recommended dosage for Nizoral shampoo is 5 mL (approximately one teaspoonful) applied to wet hair and scalp, then washed off after three to five minutes.

If you miss a dose of Nizoral, apply it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not apply two doses at once.

Pharmacokinetics

After topical application of Nizoral cream or gel, peak concentrations of ketoconazole in the skin are reached within two hours. Nizoral shampoo is rapidly absorbed following application, with peak concentrations occurring within 30 minutes.

Ketoconazole is metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 enzymes, and has a half-life of approximately two hours.

Interactions

Nizoral should not be used in combination with other topical antifungal agents. Nizoral cream or gel should not be used on skin that is sunburned, windburned, dry, chapped, or irritated.

Nizoral shampoo should not be used in combination with other medicated shampoos. Avoid getting Nizoral shampoo in your eyes. If you do get the shampoo in your eyes, rinse immediately with water and contact your doctor.

Ketoconazole may increase the plasma concentrations of certain medications, such as corticosteroids, cyclosporine, and tacrolimus. Therefore, caution is advised when using Nizoral with these medications.

Alternatives

There are many other topical antifungal agents available. Some of the most common include clotrimazole (Lotrimin), miconazole (Micatin), and terbinafine (Lamisil). These medications are often used to treat the same types of fungal infections as Nizoral.

When choosing an alternative medication, be sure to discuss all options with your healthcare provider.

Long-term effects

There are no reported long-term effects from the use of Nizoral. However, as with all medications, it is possible that some people may experience adverse reactions after prolonged use. Be sure to speak with your healthcare provider if you have any concerns.

Is miconazole more effective than clotrimazole?

There are many different types of antifungal medications available, and they are not all equally effective. In general, miconazole is more effective than clotrimazole for the treatment of fungal infections. However, the best way to determine which medication is right for you is to speak with your healthcare provider.

Overdosage

There have been no reports of overdosage with Nizoral. However, if you think you or someone else may have used too much of this medicine, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately.

Symptoms of an overdose with Nizoral may include:

Dizziness

Drowsiness

Upset stomach

Vomiting

Can I use it while pregnant or breastfeeding?

There is no information available on the use of Nizoral during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Therefore, it is best to speak with your healthcare provider before using this medication if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

What else should I know?

Nizoral is available in cream, gel, and shampoo form.

Nizoral should not be used on skin that is sunburned, windburned, dry, chapped, or irritated.

Nizoral shampoo should not be used in combination with other medicated shampoos. Avoid getting Nizoral shampoo in your eyes. If you do get the shampoo in your eyes, rinse immediately with water and contact your doctor.

Ketoconazole may increase the plasma concentrations of certain medications, such as corticosteroids, cyclosporine, and tacrolimus. Therefore, caution is advised when using Nizoral with these medications.

There are many other topical antifungal agents available. Some of the most common include clotrimazole (Lotrimin), miconazole (Micatin), and terbinafine (Lamisil). These medications are often used to treat the same types of fungal infections as Nizoral.