What is Mountain Ash Berry?

Mountain ash berry is a type of fruit that belongs to the rose family. It is also known as rowan berry, quick berry, or dogberry. The mountain ash berry grows on a tree that is native to Europe, Asia, and North America. The tree can grow up to 30 feet tall and has dark green leaves. The berries are red or orange and have a sour taste.

The mountain ash berry has been used for centuries in traditional medicine. The berries are rich in vitamins A and C, as well as antioxidants. They are believed to boost the immune system, fight inflammation, and improve circulation.

Mountain ash berry is available in supplements, teas, and tinctures. It can also be found in skincare products, as it is believed to have anti-aging properties.

Mountain Ash Berry

Side Effects and Safety

When taken by mouth:

Mountain ash berry is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth in food amounts. Mountain ash berry is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts for up to 12 weeks.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnant and breast-feeding women should avoid using mountain ash berry.

People with diabetes or high blood sugar should use caution as mountain ash berry can lower blood sugar levels.

Mountain ash berry may increase the risk of bleeding. If you take medications that increase the risk of bleeding, you should avoid using mountain ash berry.

Mechanism of Action

The exact mechanism of action of mountain ash berry is unknown. However, it is thought to work by boosting the immune system and fighting inflammation.

Dosage

There is no standard dose of mountain ash berry. It is available in supplements, teas, and tinctures.

Interactions

Mountain ash berry may interact with medications that increase the risk of bleeding. If you take medications that increase the risk of bleeding, you should avoid using mountain ash berry.

Mountain ash berry may also interact with diabetes medications. Mountain ash berry can lower blood sugar levels, which may require a change in your medication dosage.

Research

Mountain ash berry has been used for centuries in traditional medicine. However, there is limited scientific research to support its use.

A 2013 study found that mountain ash berry extract improved circulation and reduced inflammation in rats.

A 2014 study found that mountain ash berry extract had anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects in human cells.

A 2015 study found that mountain ash berry extract improved cognitive function in rats.

A 2016 study found that mountain ash berry extract improved blood sugar levels in rats with diabetes.

Alternatives to Mountain Ash Berry

There are many other fruits and vegetables that are rich in antioxidants and vitamins A and C. These include oranges, strawberries, kale, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts.

Overdosages

There is no known toxicity associated with mountain ash berry. However, it is always best to start with a lower dose and increase gradually as needed.

Pharmacokinetics

Mountain ash berry is not well studied in humans. However, it is thought to be absorbed and metabolized in the body like other fruits and vegetables.