Description

Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-acting type of insulin that is similar to human insulin. Lantus is used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in adults and children who are at least 6 years old.

Side Effects

The most common side effects of Lantus include:

– low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)

– weight gain

– injection site reactions (pain, redness, and swelling)

– itching or skin rash

– headache

– dizziness

less common side effects include:

– upper respiratory tract infection

– runny nose

– sore throat

– coughing

– nausea or vomiting

– stomach pain

– diarrhea

– constipation

– bloating or gas

– tiredness or weakness

rare side effects include:

– serious allergic reactions (anaphylaxis)

– low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)

– weight gain

– injection site reactions (pain, redness, and swelling)

– itching or skin rash

– headache

– dizziness

If you experience any of the above side effects, contact your doctor immediately.

Dosage

The usual starting dose of Lantus is one vial (100 units) daily. The Lantus dosage may be adjusted based on your individual blood sugar levels. Lantus is typically injected once a day, at the same time each day.

If you miss a dose of Lantus, take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take two doses of Lantus at the same time.

How does Lantus work?

Lantus works by mimicking the action of natural human insulin. Lantus binds to receptors on cells and causes them to take in sugar from the bloodstream. Lantus also prevents the liver from releasing sugar into the bloodstream. Lantus lowers blood sugar levels, which helps prevent complications of diabetes such as heart disease, kidney disease, blindness, and amputation.

Lantus is a long-acting insulin that begins to work within 1 to 2 hours after injection and has a duration of action of up to 24 hours. Lantus should be used in combination with other diabetes medications, such as metformin (Glucophage), sulfonylureas, or thiazolidinediones (TZDs). Lantus is also available in a pen delivery system (Solostar).

What should I avoid while taking Lantus?

Do not change the dose of Lantus without talking to your doctor. Lantus must be injected subcutaneously (under the skin) in the abdomen, thigh, or upper arm. Do not inject Lantus into a vein or muscle. Lantus should not be injected into an area where the skin is tender, bruised, red, scaly, hard, thickened, or has a lot of fat.