What is Inspra?

Inspra is a prescription medication used to treat high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. It is also used to improve survival after a heart attack. Inspra belongs to a class of drugs called angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs).

Inspra

Health Benefits

Inspra is used to treat high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. It is also used to improve survival after a heart attack. Inspra works by relaxing blood vessels and increasing blood flow. This helps to lower blood pressure and reduces the workload on the heart.

Side Effects

The most common side effects of Inspra include:

headache

dizziness

tiredness

nausea or vomiting

diarrhea

muscle or joint pain

These are the most common side effects of Inspra. Talk to your doctor if you experience any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

Serious Side Effects of Inspra

You should call your doctor right away if you experience any of the following serious side effects:

chest pain

shortness of breath

swelling of the ankles, feet, or legs

weight gain

confusion

decreased urination

fainting

If you experience any of these serious side effects, stop taking Inspra and call your doctor immediately.

rare but serious allergic reaction to Inspra. Symptoms include:

rash

hives

itching

difficulty breathing or swallowing If you experience any of these symptoms, stop taking Inspra and seek medical attention immediately.

Dosages of Inspra

The usual starting dose of Inspra for adults is 25 mg once daily. Your doctor may increase your dose to 50 mg once daily if needed. The maximum recommended dose is 50 mg once daily.

For people with congestive heart failure, the recommended starting dose is 12.5 mg once daily. Your doctor may increase your dose to 25 mg once daily if needed. The maximum recommended dose is 25 mg once daily.

For people who have had a heart attack, the recommended starting dose of Inspra is 12.5 mg once daily. Your doctor may increase your dose to 25 mg or 50 mg once daily as needed. The maximum recommended dose is 50 mg once daily.

Inspra should be taken at the same time each day.

If you miss a dose of Inspra, take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the regular time. Do not take two doses of Inspra at the same time.

Interactions

Inspra can interact with other medications, herbs, or vitamins you might be taking. An interaction is when a substance changes the way a drug works. This can be harmful or prevent the drug from working well.

To help avoid interactions, your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. Be sure to tell your doctor about all medications, herbs, and vitamins you are taking. To find out how this drug might interact with something else you’re taking, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Examples of drugs that can cause interactions with Inspra are listed below.

Sodium chloride-containing intravenous fluids: Taking Inspra with sodium chloride-containing intravenous fluids can increase the amount of potassium in your blood.

Potassium-sparing diuretics: Taking Inspra with potassium-sparing diuretics can increase the amount of potassium in your blood.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): Taking Inspra with NSAIDs can increase the risk of kidney problems.

Lithium: Taking Inspra with lithium can increase the levels of lithium in your blood. This may cause side effects.

This is not a complete list of drugs that can interact with Inspra. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How to Take It

Inspra comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once a day with or without food. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take Inspra exactly as directed.

Your doctor may start you on a low dose of Inspra and gradually increase your dose, not more than once every 2 weeks.

Inspra controls high blood pressure but does not cure it. Continue to take Inspra even if you feel well. Do not stop taking Inspra without talking to your doctor.

If you miss a dose of Inspra, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Mechanism of Action

Inspra works by inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). This system is a hormone pathway that helps regulate blood pressure. By inhibiting RAAS, Inspra lowers blood pressure.

Pharmacokinetics

Inspra is rapidly and completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. The bioavailability of Inspra is about 100%.

The half-life of Inspra is about 11 hours.

Alternatives to Inspra

There are many other drugs available to treat high blood pressure. Some may be a better fit for you than others. Talk to your doctor about other options that may work for you.

Examples of other drugs used to treat high blood pressure include:

angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs)

calcium channel blockers (CCBs)

other ACE inhibitors, such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik)

beta blockers, such as atenolol (Tenormin), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Dutoprol, Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard), nebivolol (Bystolic), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and timolol (Blocadren)

diuretics, such as bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone(Hygroton, Thalitone), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, Hydrodiuril, Microzide), and indapamide (Lozol)

ranitidine (Zantac), cimetidine (Tagamet), famotidine(Pepcid), and nizatidine (Axid)

This is not a complete list of drugs. Talk to your doctor about other options that may work for you.