TRADE NAMES

  • Genisoy Protein Shake
  • Genista Soy Protein
  • Soytein
  • Vege Fuel
  • Premium Soy Protein Booster

Soy protein is a complete protein, meaning it contains all the essential amino acids your body needs. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins, and they’re essential for many bodily functions, including muscle growth and repair, immunity, and more.

Soy protein is also a good source of fiber and antioxidants. Additionally, soy protein has been shown to have various health benefits, including reducing cholesterol levels and improving heart health.

Despite these potential health benefits, there is some concern about the safety of soy protein. This is because soy contains phytoestrogens, which are plant-based compounds that mimic the hormone estrogen. Estrogen plays an important role in women’s reproductive health, but too much estrogen can be harmful.

For this reason, it’s important to consult with a healthcare provider before adding soy protein to your diet. Additionally, women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should avoid soy protein, as it may have harmful effects on the developing fetus or infant.

Soy protein isolate is a highly purified form of soy protein that contains little to no fat or carbohydrates. It’s often used in supplements and protein powders. Soy protein concentrate is less processed than soy protein isolate and contains more of the soybean’s original nutrients.

Soy flour is made from ground, roasted soybeans and can be used in baking or as a thickener for soups and sauces. Textured soy protein (TSP) is made from defatted soy flour that has been treated to create a product with a meat-like texture. TSP can be used in place of ground beef or other meats in recipes.

Soy Protein

HOW TO TAKE IT

Soy protein is available in powder form, as well as in many food products, such as soy milk, tofu, and tempeh. It can be added to smoothies, shakes, and other recipes, or consumed on its own.

Possible side effects of soy protein include bloating, gas, and nausea. These side effects are usually mild and go away on their own. However, if you experience any severe or persistent side effects, you should consult with a healthcare provider.

SUPPLEMENTAL USES

Soy protein is often used as a dietary supplement, as it’s a good source of protein and other nutrients. It’s also sometimes added to foods, such as energy bars and shakes, to boost their protein content.

Protein is an essential nutrient that helps your body build and repair tissues, create enzymes and hormones, and more. Most people need approximately 0.36 grams of protein per pound (0.8 grams per kilogram) of body weight per day. Therefore, a person who weighs 150 pounds (68 kg) would need 54 grams of protein per day.

The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for protein is 0.36 grams per pound (0.8 grams per kilogram) of body weight per day. For example, a person who weighs 150 pounds (68 kg) would need 54 grams of protein per day. The RDA is the amount of a nutrient that you need to meet your basic needs.

Most people get more than enough protein from their diet and don’t need to take a supplement. However, some people may benefit from taking a protein supplement, including athletes, bodybuilders, and older adults.

PHARMACOKINETICS

Soy protein is a source of essential amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. When you eat soy protein, your body breaks it down into individual amino acids, which are then used for various functions, including muscle growth and repair.

The half-life of a nutrient is the time it takes for your body to reduce the blood levels of that nutrient by 50%. Soy protein has a half-life of approximately 3 hours. This means that it will take about 6 hours for your body to eliminate half of the soy protein you consume from your system.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Soy protein can interact with certain medications, such as:

  • Anticoagulants (blood thinners), such as warfarin (Coumadin)
  • Antiplatelet drugs, such as aspirin
  • Estrogens, such as birth control pills
  • Thyroid hormone replacement therapy

If you take any of these medications, you should avoid soy protein or speak with a healthcare provider before adding it to your diet.

Soy protein is also a source of isoflavones, which are plant-based compounds that have estrogen-like effects in the body. Because of this, soy protein may not be suitable for those with hormone-sensitive conditions, such as breast cancer or endometriosis. If you have one of these conditions, you should avoid soy protein or speak with a healthcare provider before adding it to your diet.

SIDE EFFECTS

Possible side effects of soy protein include:

  • Allergies
  • Digestive issues, such as bloating and diarrhea
  • Increased risk of breast cancer
  • Increased risk of endometrial cancer
  • Thyroid problems

If you experience any of these side effects, you should stop taking soy protein and speak with a healthcare provider. Additionally, those with hormone-sensitive conditions, such as breast cancer or endometriosis, should avoid soy protein or speak with a healthcare provider before adding it to their diet.

This is not a complete list of side effects. If you experience any other side effects, you should speak with a healthcare provider.

PREGNANCY AND BREASTFEEDING

Soy protein is generally considered safe for most people. However, there is some concern about its safety during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Additionally, those with hormone-sensitive conditions, such as breast cancer or endometriosis, should avoid soy protein or speak with a healthcare provider before adding it to their diet.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Soy protein can interact with some medications and may not be suitable for everyone. If you take any of the following medications, you should avoid soy protein or speak with a healthcare provider before adding it to your diet.

Anticoagulants (blood thinners), such as warfarin (Coumadin)

Antiplatelet drugs, such as aspirin and clopidogrel (Plavix)

Estrogens, such as birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy

Thyroid medication, such as levothyroxine (Synthroid)

This is not a complete list of drug interactions. If you take any other medications, you should speak with a healthcare provider to see if they interact with soy protein.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Soy protein is available in powder, bar, and capsule form. It can also be found in some foods, such as soy milk, tofu, and tempeh.

OVERDOSE

There is no standard dose of soy protein. However, most people get enough protein from their diet and don’t need to take a supplement. If you do choose to take a soy protein supplement, it’s important to speak with a healthcare provider first. This is because soy protein supplements can interact with some medications and may not be suitable for everyone.

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor or local poison control center. You can also visit the FDA website (or call 1-800-FDA-1088) to report adverse reactions or problems with products containing soy protein.

HOW TO STORE AND DISPOSE OF THIS MEDICATION

Store soy protein at room temperature in a dry, dark place. Do not store it in the bathroom.

To dispose of soy protein, mix it with an undesirable substance, such as used coffee grounds or kitty litter. Put the mixture in a sealable bag and throw it away in the trash.