TRADE NAMES

  • Selenate
  • Selenite
  • Selenomethionine
  • Sodium selenite

Selenium is a trace element that plays an important role in human and animal nutrition. It is found in small amounts in the body, but its functions are essential for health. Selenium is involved in many processes, including metabolism, reproduction, and detoxification. It also has antioxidant properties and helps to protect cells from damage. Deficiencies of selenium can lead to various health problems, so it is important to make sure that you are getting enough of this nutrient in your diet. Foods that are rich in selenium include fish, meat, poultry, eggs, nuts, and seeds. You can also get selenium supplements from your healthcare provider.

Selenium

POTENTIAL USES

Selenium has many potential uses, including:

  • Boosting the immune system
  • preventing cancer
  • treating infertility
  • reducing the risk of heart disease
  • thyroid support.

However, more research is needed to confirm these potential uses.

What are some food sources of selenium?

Selenium is found in many foods, including fish, meat, poultry, eggs, nuts, and seeds. You can also get selenium supplements from your healthcare provider.

What are the potential uses of selenium?

Selenium has many potential uses, including boosting the immune system, preventing cancer, treating infertility, reducing the risk of heart disease, and thyroid support. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential uses.

What are the side effects of selenium?

Selenium is generally considered safe when taken in recommended doses. Side effects may include gastrointestinal upset, skin rashes, and garlic breath. It can also interact with certain medications, so be sure to talk to your healthcare provider before taking selenium supplements. Selenium can be toxic in high doses, so it is important not to take more than the recommended amount.

ACTIONS AND PHARMACOLOGY

The exact mechanisms by which selenium exerts its effects are not fully understood. Selenium is known to be involved in many processes in the body, including metabolism, reproduction, and detoxification. It also has antioxidant properties and helps to protect cells from damage.

PHARMACOKINETICS

Selenium is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed throughout the body. It is excreted in the urine and feces.

CLINICAL TRIALS

Clinical trials are research studies that evaluate the safety and effectiveness of new treatments. Selenium has been studied for many potential uses, but more research is needed to confirm its effectiveness. Some clinical trials that have been conducted on selenium include:

A trial that found that selenium supplements may reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer

A trial that found that selenium supplements may improve fertility in men

A trial that found that selenium supplements may improve symptoms of Graves’ disease.

More research is needed to confirm the potential benefits of selenium.

SAFETY

Selenium is generally considered safe when taken in recommended doses. Side effects may include gastrointestinal upset, skin rashes, and garlic breath. It can also interact with certain medications, so be sure to talk to your healthcare provider before taking selenium supplements. Selenium can be toxic in high doses, so it is important not to take more than the recommended amount.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Selenium is used for many different purposes. Some of the potential uses include boosting the immune system, preventing cancer, treating infertility, reducing the risk of heart disease, and thyroid support. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential uses.

PRECAUTIONS AND WARNING

Selenium can be toxic in high doses. The maximum safe dose of selenium is: Adults: 400 micrograms per day. Pregnant women: 280 micrograms per day. Lactating women: 200 micrograms per day. Be sure to talk to your healthcare provider before taking selenium supplements to make sure they are right for you.

DOSAGE

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for selenium is:

  • Adults: 55 micrograms per day
  • Pregnant women: 60 micrograms per day
  • Lactating women: 70 micrograms per day.

You can get the RDA for selenium from food or supplements. Be sure to talk to your healthcare provider before taking selenium supplements to make sure they are right for you.

OVERDOSE

If you think you have taken too much selenium, call your healthcare provider or poison control center right away. Signs of an overdose may include vomiting, diarrhoea, muscle weakness, and tremors.

WHAT TO DO IF MISSED A DOSE

If you miss a dose of selenium, take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the regular time. Do not take two doses of selenium at the same time.

STORAGE

Selenium should be stored at room temperature, away from light and moisture. Be sure to keep Selenium out of the reach of children and pets.