Peppermint is a cross between water mint and spearmint. Native to Europe and the Mediterranean region, the plant is now widely distributed throughout the world.

Peppermint typically grows to a height of 30–90 cm (12–35 in). The rhizomes are wide-spreading, fleshy, and bare fibrous roots. The leaves are from 4–9 cm (1.6–3.5 in) long and 1.5–4 cm (0.59–1.57 in) broad; they are dark green with reddish veins, and they have an entire margin that is slightly fuzzy. The flowers are white or pale pink, 2–4 mm (0.079–0.157 in) long, with a four-lobed corolla about 5 mm (0.20 in) in diameter; they are produced in clusters from the leaf axils, forming slender, 10–30 cm (3.9–11.8 in) long inflorescences. Flowering season lasts from June to August.[citation needed] The fruit is a small dry capsule containing tiny black seeds.

Peppermint is a perennial plant that grows best in moist, shady locations. It spreads quickly by runners or rhizomes, and can become invasive left. The leaves of the peppermint plant are used to make peppermint oil, which is used as a flavoring agent in food and beverages, as well as in many other products such as soaps and cosmetics. Peppermint oil also has a number of other uses, including aromatherapy, treatments for skin and hair, and as a natural insecticide.

Peppermint is a hybrid plant, a cross between water mint (Mentha aquatica) and spearmint (Mentha spicata). It is thought to have originated in the Mediterranean region, although it is now found all over the world.

Before Using:

Some people may be allergic to peppermint. If you are allergic to other plants in the Lamiaceae family, such as basil, catnip, lavender, marjoram, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, or thyme, you may also be allergic to peppermint.

Peppermint oil is generally safe when used correctly. However, there are some potential side effects and interactions to be aware of.

Possible side effects of peppermint oil include:

– Allergic reactions: Peppermint oil can cause allergic reactions in some people. If you experience any symptoms of an allergy after using peppermint oil, stop using it and see your doctor.

– Heartburn: Peppermint oil can relax the smooth muscle that lines the digestive tract. This may result in heartburn or indigestion in some people. If you experience these symptoms after using peppermint oil, try using a lower dose or diluting the oil with a carrier oil such as olive oil.

– Interactions: Peppermint oil can interact with certain medications, such as those used to treat heart conditions and asthma. If you are taking any medication, speak to your doctor before using peppermint oil.

Pregnant women and young children should avoid using peppermint oil. There is not enough evidence to say whether it is safe for pregnant women to use peppermint oil, so it is best to err on the side of caution.

Dosage:

The recommended dose of peppermint oil is 0.2-0.4 ml (6-12 drops) 3 times daily.

To store this medicine:

Store in a cool, dry place. Do not refrigerate.

Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medicine out of reach of children and never share your medicine with anyone.

Lycium is a genus of flowering plants in the nightshade family, Solanaceae. The genus includes about 90 species, which are mostly native to Africa, Asia, and Australia. A few species are native to North America; one (L. barbarum) is even naturalized in Europe and another (L. chinense) in northern Mexico.[1] They are sometimes known as wolfberries or boxthorns. Members of the genus Lycium are low-growing shrubs with ovate to lanceolate leaves often.

Other Side Effects:

In addition to the potential side effects and interactions listed above, peppermint oil can also cause:

Diarrhea: Peppermint oil can relax the smooth muscle that lines the digestive tract. This may result in diarrhea in some people. If you experience this side effect, try using a lower dose or diluting the oil with a carrier oil such as olive oil.

Headache: Peppermint oil can cause headaches in some people. If you experience this side effect, try using a lower dose or diluting the oil with a carrier oil such as olive oil.

If you experience any of these side effects, stop using peppermint oil and see your doctor.