Glycerol is a clear, colorless and viscous liquid that is widely used in pharmaceutical formulations. It has a sweet taste, and is non-toxic and non-irritating. Glycerol is hygroscopic, meaning it absorbs water from the air. This property makes it useful as a humectant (a substance that helps maintain moisture), solvent, and emollient (a substance that softens and soothes the skin).

Glycerol is derived from triglycerides (fats and oils), and can be manufactured from propylene glycol or sorbitol. It is also a by-product of biodiesel production.

Glycerol has many uses in the pharmaceutical industry. It is used as a solvent, emulsifier, and humectant in many oral, topical, and injectable medications. It is also used as a cryoprotectant (a substance that helps prevent freezing) in some vaccines.

Glycerol is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

However, it can cause gastrointestinal upset and diarrhea in some people. It is important to drink plenty of fluids when taking glycerol-containing medications to prevent dehydration.

If you are allergic to glycerol, you should not take medications that contain it. You should also avoid products that contain propylene glycol or sorbitol, as these can also cause an allergic reaction.

Glycerol is a clear, colorless and viscous liquid that is widely used in pharmaceutical formulations. It has a sweet taste, and is non-toxic and non-irritating. Glycerol is hygroscopic, meaning it absorbs water from the air. This property makes it useful as a humectant (a substance that helps maintain moisture), solvent, and emollient (a substance that softens and soothes the skin).

Glycerol is derived from triglycerides (fats and oils), and can be manufactured from propylene glycol or sorbitol. It is also a by-product of biodiesel production.

Glycerol has many uses in the pharmaceutical industry. It is used as a solvent, emulsifier, and humectant in many oral, topical, and injectable medications. It is also used as a cryoprotectant (a substance that helps prevent freezing) in some vaccines.

However, it can cause gastrointestinal upset and diarrhea in some people. It is important to drink plenty of fluids when taking glycerol-containing medications to prevent dehydration.

If you are allergic to glycerol, you should not take medications that contain it. You should also avoid products that contain propylene glycol or sorbitol, as these can also cause an allergic reaction.

Glycerol

What is it used for?

Glycerol is used in many different products, including:

– oral medications

– topical medications

– injectable medications

– vaccines

– cosmetics

– food and beverages

– tobacco products

Oral Medications: Glycerol is used as a solvent, emulsifier, and humectant in many oral medications. It helps to keep the medication evenly distributed in the liquid form, and prevents it from drying out or clumping together. It also helps to keep the medication from evaporating when exposed to air. Topical Medications: Glycerol is often used in topical medications, such as creams, ointments, and gels. It helps to keep the active ingredients evenly distributed throughout the product, and prevents them from drying out or clumping together. It also helps to keep the product from evaporating when exposed to air. Injectable Medications: Glycerol is used as a cryoprotectant in some injectable medications. It helps to prevent the medication from freezing, and makes it easier to administer the medication into the body. Vaccines: Glycerol is used as a cryoprotectant in some vaccines. It helps to prevent the vaccine from freezing, and makes it easier to administer the vaccine into the body. Cosmetics: Glycerol is used as an emollient and humectant in many cosmetics, such as lotions, creams, and shampoos. It helps to keep the skin or hair moist, and prevents dryness and irritation. Food and Beverages: Glycerol is used as a sweetener, humectant, and emulsifier in many food and beverage products. It helps to keep the product moist, and prevents it from drying out or clumping together. It also gives the product a sweet taste. Tobacco Products: Glycerol is used as a humidifying agent in some tobacco products. It helps to keep the tobacco moist, and prevents it from drying out or crumbling.

What are the side effects?

Glycerol can cause gastrointestinal upset and diarrhea in some people. It is important to drink plenty of fluids when taking glycerol-containing medications to prevent dehydration.

If you are allergic to glycerol, you should not take medications that contain it. You should also avoid products that contain propylene glycol or sorbitol, as these can also cause an allergic reaction.

Glycerol is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, it can cause gastrointestinal upset and diarrhea in some people. It is important to drink plenty of fluids when taking glycerol-containing medications to prevent dehydration.

If you are allergic to glycerol, you should not take medications that contain it. You should also avoid products that contain propylene glycol or sorbitol, as these can also cause an allergic reaction.

PHARMACOKINETICS

Glycerol is rapidly and completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. Peak plasma concentrations occur within 30 minutes to 2 hours of oral administration. Glycerol is metabolized in the liver to glyceraldehyde, which is then converted to glucose and used for energy. Glycerol is excreted in the urine as glycerate.

TOXICOLOGY

Glycerol is relatively nontoxic. The LD50 (lethal dose that kills 50% of the population) in rats is 15 g/kg orally, and 6 g/kg intraperitoneally. The LD50 in mice is 8 g/kg orally, and 3 g/kg intraperitoneally.

IARC Carcinogenicity Classification: Glycerol is not classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

US EPA Carcinogenicity Classification: Glycerol is not classified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Teratogenicity and Embryotoxicity: There is no evidence that glycerol causes birth defects or developmental toxicity in humans. Animal studies have shown that oral administration of glycerol during pregnancy can cause fetal death, stillbirth, and congenital anomalies. Intravenous administration of glycerol during pregnancy can also cause embryotoxicity and fetotoxicity.

PREGNANCY

Category C (US FDA): There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Glycerol should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Labor and Delivery: Glycerol has no known effect on labor or delivery.

NURSING MOTHERS

Glycerol is excreted in human milk. The effects of glycerol on nursing infants are not known.

PEDIATRIC USE

There is no information on the use of glycerol in children. Glycerol should be used with caution in children due to the potential for gastrointestinal upset and diarrhea.

GERIATRIC USE

There is no information on the use of glycerol in elderly patients. Glycerol should be used with caution in elderly patients due to the potential for gastrointestinal upset and diarrhea.