What is Choline?

Choline is an essential nutrient that is found in many foods, including eggs, meat, poultry, fish, and some vegetables. It is also available as a dietary supplement. Choline is important for many functions in the body, including brain development and function, liver function, and muscle movement.

History of Choline

Choline was first identified in 1848 by German chemist Hugo Erdmann as a component of bile. In 1898, it was shown to be an essential nutrient for rats. Choline is named after the Greek word for bile, chole.

Health Benefits of Choline

Choline has many important health benefits, including supporting brain development and function, liver function, and muscle movement. Choline is also important for pregnant women and their babies.

Brain Development and Function

Choline is important for brain development and function. It helps to maintain the structure of cell membranes, supports nerve signaling, and aids in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is involved in memory, attention, and muscle control. Choline also helps to prevent cognitive decline and dementia.

Liver Function

Choline is important for liver function. It helps to break down fats and cholesterol, and it plays a role in detoxification. Choline deficiency can lead to fatty liver disease.

Muscle Movement

Choline is important for muscle movement. It helps to maintain the structure of cell membranes, supports nerve signaling, and aids in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Acetylcholine is involved in muscle contraction. Choline deficiency can lead to muscle weakness.

Pregnancy and Infancy

Choline is important for pregnant women and their babies. It helps to prevent birth defects, supports brain development, and aids in the production of breast milk. Choline deficiency during pregnancy can lead to birth defects, including neural tube defects. Choline is also important for infancy, as it supports brain development and aids in the absorption of fat.

Dietary Sources of Choline

Choline is found in many foods, including eggs, meat, poultry, fish, and some vegetables. It is also available as a dietary supplement. Choline is important for many functions in the body, including brain development and function, liver function, and muscle movement.

Eggs

Eggs are a good source of choline. One large egg contains about 147 mg of choline.

Meat, Poultry, and Fish

Meat, poultry, and fish are good sources of choline. Three ounces of cooked beef liver contains about 425 mg of choline. Three ounces of cooked chicken breast contains about 120 mg of choline. Three ounces of cooked Tilapia fish contains about 85 mg of choline.

Vegetables

Some vegetables are good sources of choline. One cup of boiled Brussels sprouts contains about 115 mg of choline. One

Why do people take choline?

Choline is taken by mouth for memory enhancement, Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), heart disease and stroke, myelin formation (a substance that forms a sheath around nerve cells), preventing cancer of the colon or rectum, and reducing inflammation.

Choline is used intravenously (by IV) for treating liver disease.

Choline is applied to the skin for treating psoriasis.

How does choline work?

Choline is important for many functions in the body, including brain development and function, liver function, and muscle movement.

Choline is a precursor to acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that is important for memory, learning, and muscle control. Choline also helps to maintain the structure of cell membranes and helps in the transport of fats in the body.

Are there safety concerns?

Choline is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately or when used intravenously (by IV) under medical supervision. Choline has been used safely in adults in doses up to 3 grams daily for up to 12 weeks.

Choline is POSSIBLY SAFE when applied to the skin. Choline has been used safely in children in doses up to 400 milligrams daily for up to 12 weeks.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Choline is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately or when used intravenously (by IV) under medical supervision. Choline has been used safely in pregnant women in doses up to 3 grams daily for up to 12 weeks. Not enough is known about the safety of using choline on the skin during pregnancy. We recommend that you consult your healthcare provider before using this product if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Children: Choline is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately or when used intravenously (by IV) under medical supervision. Choline has been used safely in children in doses up to 400 milligrams daily for up to 12 weeks. Not enough is known about the safety of using choline on the skin in children. We recommend that you consult your healthcare provider before using this product in children.