What is Disalcid?

Disalcid is a prescription medicine used to treat gout and prevent recurrent gout attacks. Disalcid belongs to a class of drugs called xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

It is not known how Disalcid works to decrease the risk of gout attacks.

Health Benefits

In clinical studies, Disalcid has been shown to:

– Decrease the number of gout flares

– Improve gout symptoms

– Reduce uric acid levels in the blood

Side Effects

Common side effects of Disalcid include:

– Nausea

– Vomiting

– Diarrhea

– Abdominal pain

– Rash

– Headache

Less common side effects include:

– Blurred vision

– Changes in taste

– Ringing in the ears

If you experience any of these serious side effects, stop taking Disalcid and call your doctor right away.

Dosages

Disalcid is available as a tablet in the following strengths:

– 500 mg

– 750 mg

The recommended starting dose of Disalcid for gout is 750 mg taken orally four times a day, or 3000 mg once daily. Your doctor may adjust your dose based on your response to treatment.

Take Disalcid with food or milk to decrease the risk of stomach upset.

Swallow the tablet whole and do not crush, chew, or break it.

If you miss a dose of Disalcid, take it as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule.

Interactions

Disalcid may interact with other medications. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Disalcid should not be used during pregnancy unless the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Examples of medications that may interact with Disalcid include:

– Allopurinol

– Azathioprine

– Cyclosporine

– Mercaptopurine

– Theophylline

– Warfarin

– Zidovudine

This is not a complete list of Disalcid drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Mechanism of Action

The exact mechanism of action of Disalcid is unknown. It is thought to work by inhibiting xanthine oxidase, the enzyme responsible for the production of uric acid. By reducing uric acid levels, Disalcid may decrease the risk of gout attacks.

Pharmacokinetics

Absorption: Disalcid is rapidly and completely absorbed following oral administration.

Distribution: Disalcid is widely distributed throughout the body.

Metabolism and Elimination: Disalcid is metabolized in the liver by oxidation and conjugation. The metabolites are excreted in the urine. Disalcid has a half-life of 1 to 2 hours.

Alternatives to Disalcid

There are many alternatives to Disalcid for the treatment of gout. Some of these include:

– Allopurinol

– Colchicine

– Indomethacin

– Naproxen

– Probenecid

These are just a few examples. There are many other medications available by prescription and over-the-counter that can be used to treat gout. Talk to your doctor about all of your options before deciding on a treatment plan.

Clinical Trials

In a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 496 patients with gout, Disalcid was shown to be effective in reducing the number of gout flares and improving gout symptoms.

In another 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 582 patients with gout, Disalcid was shown to be more effective than placebo in reducing uric acid levels in the blood and preventing recurrent gout attacks.

There are many other clinical trials that have looked at the efficacy of Disalcid in the treatment of gout. These studies have generally shown Disalcid to be safe and effective in the short-term treatment of gout.

Is Naproxen more effective than Disalcid?

There is no definitive answer to this question. Both medications have been shown to be effective in the treatment of gout. Some studies have shown Naproxen to be more effective than Disalcid, while other studies have not found a difference in efficacy between the two drugs. Talk to your doctor about which medication is right for you.