What is coriander?

Coriander, also known as cilantro or Chinese parsley, is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the most commonly used in cooking. Coriander is native to regions spanning from southern Europe and northern Africa to southwestern Asia. It is a soft plant growing to 50 cm (20 in) tall. The leaves are variable in shape, broadly lobed at the base of the plant, and slender and feathery higher on the flowering stems. The flowers are borne in small umbels, white or very pale pink, asymmetrical, with the petals pointing away from the center of the umbel longer (5–6 mm or 0⁄4–0⁄2 in) than those pointing toward it (only 1–3 mm or 0⁄06–0⁄12 in long). The fruit is a globular, dry schizocarp 3–5 mm (0.12–0.20 in) in diameter.

What are the benefits of coriander?

Coriander has a number of potential health benefits, including:

* Acting as an anti-inflammatory agent

* Helping to lower cholesterol levels

* Regulating blood sugar levels

* Supporting digestive health

* Aiding in detoxification

* Boosting the immune system

* Reducing anxiety and relieving stress

While more research is needed to confirm these potential health benefits, eating coriander as part of a healthy diet is generally considered safe.

Coriander can be used in many different dishes, from soups and stews to curries and salads. It can also be used as a garnish or added to smoothies and juices. When using fresh coriander, the leaves and stems can be chopped and added to your dish. Dried coriander seeds can also be used whole or ground. Coriander is also available in supplement form.

  • Side Effects & Safety

Coriander is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts typically found in foods. Coriander is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as a medicine in medicinal amounts. Some people can have an allergic reaction to coriander. Symptoms can include itching, swelling of the lips, tongue, and throat, and wheezing. It’s not known if this is more likely to occur in people with allergies to other plants in the Apiaceae family, such as carrots, celery, or fennel.

Coriander leaves are used in many traditional Indian dishes. They can also be used to make a tea that has a number of potential health benefits. When taking supplements, it’s important to follow the directions on the package and speak to your healthcare provider if you have any concerns.

Dosage

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

For cholesterol: 1-3 grams of coriander seeds daily.

For diabetes: 2 grams of coriander seeds, two times daily with meals. Another study used 1 gram of coriander seeds, three times daily with meals.

For digestive disorders such as indigestion, bloating, and flatulence: 500 mg of coriander leaf oil, twice daily after meals for 4 weeks has been used. However, other research suggests that taking 2 grams of coriander powder two or three times daily for 8 weeks does not reduce symptoms.

For High blood pressure: A specific product containing equal parts of coriander, fennel, and anise oil (CBF) has been used in a dose of 20 drops 3 times daily for 4 weeks.

For osteoarthritis: 500 mg of coriander leaf oil, twice daily after meals for 4 weeks has been used.

For skin conditions such as psoriasis and eczema: A specific product containing equal parts of coriander, fennel, and anise oil (CBF) has been applied to the skin three times daily for 8 weeks.

For flatulence: 2 grams of coriander powder two or three times daily for 8 weeks does not reduce symptoms.

Coriander is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as a medicine in medicinal amounts. Some people can have an allergic reaction to coriander. Symptoms can include itching, swelling of the lips, tongue, and throat, and wheezing. It’s not known if this is more likely to occur in people with allergies to other plants in the Apiaceae family, such as carrots, celery, or fennel.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of coriander during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Allergy to plants in the carrot family: There is some concern that people who are allergic to birch pollen or plants in the carrot family, such as celery, dill, or fennel, might also be allergic to coriander.

Asthma: People with asthma should avoid using coriander. Coriander can make asthma worse.

High blood pressure: There is some concern that taking large amounts of coriander might cause high blood pressure.

Surgery: Coriander might slow blood clotting. This might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking coriander at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

Coriander might slow blood clotting. Taking coriander along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications used to treat high blood pressure include captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), ramipril (Altace), and others.