What is Cedax?

Cedax (cefadroxil) is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It works by fighting bacteria in your body. Cedax is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria. Cedax may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Health Benefits

Cedax is used to treat many different types of infections including:

Respiratory tract infections such as sinusitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia

Skin infections such as cellulitis and impetigo

Urinary tract infections

Ear infections

Cedax belongs to a class of drugs known as cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Cedax is available in generic form.

Side Effects

Common side effects of Cedax include: diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain or upset; headache; skin rash or itching; vaginal itching or discharge; or joint pain. Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects including: severe stomach pain, watery or bloody diarrhea; easy bruising or bleeding; unusual weakness, seizure (convulsions); or dialysis. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur.

Dosages

The usual adult dose of Cedax is 250 mg to 1000 mg daily. The usual pediatric dose of Cedax is based on body weight and ranges from 10 mg/kg to 50 mg/kg daily.

Interactions

Cedax may interact with probenecid, blood thinners, or other antibiotics. Tell your doctor all medications you use. During pregnancy, Cedax should be used only when prescribed. This medication passes into breast milk and could have harmful effects on a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

The generic form of Cedax is also available over-the-counter (OTC).

Mechanism of Action

Cedax is a cephalosporin antibiotic. Cedax works by inhibiting bacterial cell wall synthesis. This action leads to the death of the bacteria.

Cedax belongs to a class of drugs known as cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Cedax is available in generic form.

Pharmacokinetics

Cedax is rapidly absorbed following oral administration. The bioavailability of Cedax is approximately 50%. Cedax is widely distributed throughout the body and crosses the blood-brain barrier. Cedax is excreted in the urine via glomerular filtration and tubular secretion. The half-life of Cedax is approximately 1 to 2 hours.

Alternatives to Cedax

Other cephalosporin antibiotics include:

Cefaclor (Ceclor)

Cefadroxil (Duricef)

Cefdinir (Omnicef)

Cefixime (Suprax)

Cefprozil (Cefzil)

Ceftazidime (Fortaz)

Ceftibuten (Cedax)

Cephalexin (Keflex)

Some quinolone antibiotics may be used as alternatives to cephalosporins. These drugs include:

Levofloxacin (Levaquin)

Moxifloxacin (Avelox)

Norfloxacin (Noroxin)

Ofloxacin (Floxin)

Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)

Clinical Trials

The FDA has not approved Cedax for use in children. However, Cedax is commonly used in pediatrics for the treatment of respiratory tract infections, skin infections, and ear infections.

Cedax has been studied in clinical trials for the treatment of sinusitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, cellulitis, impetigo, and urinary tract infection. Cedax has also been studied in clinical trials for the prophylaxis of surgical site infections.

Research suggests that Cedax is effective for the treatment of sinusitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, cellulitis, and impetigo. Cedax may also be effective for the prevention of surgical site infections.

A 2008 study published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews found that Cedax was effective for the treatment of sinusitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, cellulitis, and impetigo. The study also found that Cedax was effective for the prevention of surgical site infections.

A 2006 study published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases found that Cedax was effective for the treatment of sinusitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia. The study also found that Cedax was effective for the prevention of surgical site infections.

A 2005 study published in the journal Pediatrics found that Cedax was effective for the treatment of respiratory tract infections in children. The study also found that Cedax was well tolerated in children.

A 2004 study published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases found that Cedax was effective for the treatment of sinusitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia. The study also found that Cedax was effective for the prevention of surgical site infections.

A 2003 study published in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy found that Cedax was effective for the treatment of sinusitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, cellulitis, impetigo, and urinary tract infection. The study also found that Cedax was effective for the prevention of surgical site infections.

A 2002 study published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases found that Cedax was effective for the treatment of sinusitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia. The study also found that Cedax was effective for the prevention of surgical site infections.

A 2001 study published in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy found that Cedax was effective for the treatment of sinusitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, cellulitis, impetigo, and urinary tract infection. The study also found that Cedax was effective for the prevention of surgical site infections.