What is borage oil?

Borage oil is extracted from the seeds of the borage plant (Borago officinalis), which is native to Europe and Asia. The borage plant has been used medicinally for centuries, and its oil has a variety of uses.

Borage oil is rich in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an essential fatty acid that our bodies need but cannot produce on their own. GLA is a precusor to prostaglandins, hormonelike substances that play an important role in many body functions, including inflammation, immunity, and blood pressure control.

Because of its high GLA content, borage oil is sometimes used as a natural treatment for conditions like eczema, rheumatoid arthritis, and premenstrual syndrome (PMS). It is also being studied as a possible treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders.

Borage oil is available in capsules and can also be found in some natural skin care products.

How to take borage oil?

Borage oil should be taken with food. The recommended dose is 1-2 grams per day.

Borage oil is generally considered safe, but it can cause side effects like diarrhea, flatulence, and belching in some people. If you experience these side effects, stop taking borage oil and talk to your doctor.

Do not take borage oil if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

What are the possible benefits of borage oil?

The potential benefits of borage oil include:

Reducing inflammation

Relieving symptoms of PMS

Treating eczema

Improving joint health

Lowering blood pressure

Reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders

Dosage

1-2 grams per day. Capsules are available.

Possible side effects

Diarrhea, flatulence, belching, headache. Pregnant or breastfeeding women should not take borage oil.

Pharmacokinetics

After oral administration, borage oil is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. The peak plasma concentration is reached within 2-4 hours. Borage oil is widely distributed in the body and is excreted in the urine and feces as free fatty acids and glycerides.

Half-life

The elimination half-life of borage oil is about 9 hours.

Pregnancy and lactation

Borage oil should not be used by pregnant or breastfeeding women due to lack of safety data.

Long-term effects

There are no data on the long-term effects of borage oil.

Alternatives

There are no known alternatives to borage oil.

Mechanism of action

The mechanism of action of borage oil is not fully understood. GLA is a precusor to prostaglandins, hormonelike substances that play an important role in many body functions, including inflammation, immunity, and blood pressure control.

Research suggests that borage oil may also have antioxidant and neuroprotective effects.

Research

The potential benefits of borage oil are supported by some research, but more studies are needed to confirm its efficacy.

A 2008 study found that borage oil was effective in reducing the severity of symptoms in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis.

A 2009 study found that borage oil improved the quality of life in patients with atopic dermatitis (eczema).

A 2010 study found that borage oil was effective in reducing the symptoms of PMS.

A 2012 study found that borage oil may have neuroprotective effects and could be a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders.

A 2016 study found that borage oil was effective in reducing blood pressure in patients with hypertension.

Overdosages

There are no reports of borage oil overdoses.

Storage

Borage oil should be stored at room temperature in a dark, dry place.

Can Borage Oil treat Alzheimer’s disease?

Research suggests that borage oil may have neuroprotective effects and could be a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders. However, more research is needed to confirm these findings.

How do I get Borage Oil?

Borage oil is available in capsules and can also be found in some natural skin care products.